Happy Birthday Tedd

Happy Birthday Tedd

Tedd has just celebrated his 1st birthday and to celebrate we have made a video showcasing all the places he has visited in Europe

Tedd’s Trip to Model Council

Tedd’s Trip to Model Council

Having spent much time researching and preparing for our debates, we were both exited and eager to board our train on the morning of the Model Council. By 7:20am, we were seated and ready to begin our trip to Dublin Castle. We used this opportunity to spruce up our debates adding some rhetorical questions and discussing the potential questions we may be challenged with. All seemed to be going well, until the train came to a stop 2km short of Heuston Station. We waited anxiously unaware of the reason for our sudden stop, but yet again used this opportunity to practice our presentation. Tedd took to twitter expressing his concern over missing the event. As if having heard him, the engines came back on almost instantaneously.B_LiqQhWoAEj--i

 

Having been set back 1 hour already it was important that we went full speed ahead, darting to the Luas, just about ensuring that all 11 of us were present before it quickly sped off. We scurried through the streets of Dublin one after the other, pretending we knew where we were going. Having made it to what we thought was Dublin Castle, we asked a local for assistance, to which he smirked; pointing around the corner.On our arrival we were greeted by the hosts of the event and were quickly checked in. Without a moment’s thought we were brought over to the photographing area where we were given the opportunity to meet the official representative of the Netherlands – the country we were representing. It was a great opportunity for us to discuss some of our proposals and to make him aware of our stance on the issue at hand and our reasons for it.

With the ding of a bell, the event began. We were directed towards our seating area. Ours marked by the Netherland’s flag sitting proud on our front desk. Belgium kicked off the debate, followed soon after by Bulgaria and Germany. As each representing country spoke we noted their stances and proposals, whilst also adding and cutting our own presentation in relation to what had already been said. After the UK had spoken, the initial round of the Model Council Concluded.

During the interval between rounds we availed of the opportunity to discuss the topic with other countries. Convincing and persuading them to inspect the issue through the eyes of the smaller European countries. In conclusion the alliance was made between a number of smaller EU countries that we would together strive to achieve an average 30% share of renewable energy .

In the third round Lithuania and Malta proposed this to our chairperson and when put to vote , passed with flying colours. As the event concluded our Judges retreated to their quarters to make their final decision. Shortly after the winner was announced, It was Bulgaria !

 

In conclusion , the event was absolutely fantastic ! Despite the setbacks in the transport to the event , we still managed to thoroughly enjoy our day and would recommend it to any othe school considering to take part.

 

 

 

 

St Patrick’s Day

St Patrick’s Day

IMG_7064Hi All,

Today I visited the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Limerick, Ireland. Here’s some information that I found out about St. Patrick… Happy reading!

Saint Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. St Patrick is credited with bringing Christianity to Ireland. Most of what is known about him comes from his two works; the Confessio, a spiritual autobiography, and his Epistola, a denunciation of British mistreatment of Irish Christians.

According to different versions of his life story it is said that he was born in Britain, around 385AD. His parents Calpurnius and Conchessa were Roman citizens living in either Scotland or Wales. As a boy of 14 he was captured and taken to Ireland where he spent six years in slavery herding sheep. He returned to Ireland in his 30s as a missionary among the Celtic pagans.

Saint Patrick described himself as a “most humble-minded man, pouring forth a continuous paean of thanks to his Maker for having chosen him as the instrument whereby multitudes who had worshipped idols and unclean things had become the people of God.”

Many folk ask the question ‘Why is the Shamrock the National Flower of Ireland?’ The reason is that St. Patrick used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagans. Saint Patrick is believed to have been born in the late fourth century, and is often confused with Palladius, a bishop who was sent by Pope Celestine in 431 to be the first bishop to the Irish believers in Christ.

In the custom known as “drowning the shamrock”, the shamrock that has been worn on a lapel or hat is put in the last drink of the evening.

Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. It is true there are no snakes in Ireland, but there probably never have been – the island was separated from the rest of the continent at the end of the Ice Age. As in many old pagan religions, serpent symbols were common and often worshipped. Driving the snakes from Ireland was probably symbolic of putting an end to that pagan practice. While not the first to bring Christianity to Ireland, it is Patrick who is said to have encountered the Druids at Tara and abolished their pagan rites. The story holds that he converted the warrior chiefs and princes, baptizing them and thousands of their subjects in the “Holy Wells” that still bear this name.

There are several accounts of Saint Patrick’s death. One says that Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on March 17, 460 A.D. His jawbone was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits, and as a preservative against the “evil eye.” Another account says that St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury, England and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Glastonbury Abbey. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after St. Patrick, including cathedrals in New York and Dublin city